Living in the House Where Bugsy Siegel Was Killed for $16.99M

A little crime biz history hits the market.

The tony Southern California villa where a Jewish mobster was killed is looking for a new owner.

In 1947, Bugsy Siegel – known for his involvement in the development of the Las Vegas Strip and for being a gangster – breathed his last, at the age of 41, when a sniper shot him through the window of his Beverly Hills home. Gave. That property is now available for purchase with Myra Normand of Normand & Associates for $16.99 million.

“The Bugsy Siegel estate is very special,” Normand told The Post of the seven-bedroom manse. She sees the buyer as having an eye for architecture and period homes that are somewhat more unique than your average cookie-cutter modern. “The seller did a lot of restoration work throughout the house to maintain its original character and design, including the bathrooms, which have been restored to their original design,” he said of the current owners, Fiona Chalom and plastic surgeon Dr. Added Joel Aronowitz.

The Spanish Colonial-style complex, designed by Joseph Fox & Sons, still has many original details, including wrought iron railings and hand-painted tiles in the two-story entry. All have been maintained to resemble how they appeared shortly after construction in 1928 hollywood reporterWho first reported the listing.

Bugsy Siegel Murder Mansion
The property was built in 1928.
Courtesy of Normand & Associates
Bugsy Siegel Murder Mansion
The stunning entrance hall has its original wrought iron railing.
Courtesy of Normand & Associates
Bugsy Siegel Murder Mansion
The pool was recently installed.
Courtesy of Normand & Associates
Bugsy Siegel Murder Mansion
The estate has seven bedrooms.
Courtesy of Normand & Associates
Bugsy Siegel Murder Mansion
There is a brand new kitchen in the house.
Courtesy of Normand & Associates
Bugsy Siegel Murder Mansion
The home is 7,092 square feet, which includes plenty of space for dining.
Courtesy of Normand & Associates
Bugsy Siegel Murder Mansion
Details include beautiful beamed ceilings.
Courtesy of Normand & Associates
Bugsy Siegel Murder Mansion
Mugshot of Bugsy Siegel on February 12, 1928.
Getty Images

“A lot of Spanish homes built in the ’20s have a heavy, heavy, dark feel. Unlike them, this home is full of light with windows everywhere and high ceilings,” Normand told the outlet.

In addition to its old-fashioned charm, the 7,092-square-foot spread — which is set on half an acre — also features several modern upgrades, including a new pool and a kitchen equipped with a Sub-Zero refrigerator.

“There is also a tower in this house and there is a room at the top of the tower,” Normand told the reporter.

A turret room and a mob death not enough drama? The house’s block also made news for the time the late business magnate Howard Hughes’ plane crashed into it.

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